Brad's Repairs

For any musician no matter their level of experience, whether a student or professional, it’s crucial to have your instrument in playing condition. And when you don’t, or are waiting on a part to arrive, that’s time taken away from practicing and/or gigging. Especially with UIL competitions approaching, it is more important than ever for students to have easy access to quick repairs, and not having your instrument (the one you’re most comfortable playing), or having to play an instrument not in its best condition because you’re waiting on a part could harm your chances at UIL, or could cause you to miss out on an important gig.

Brad Waresback - repair-technician at our Burleson store - is going above and beyond to take care of customers in need of a quick turn-around on their instrument repairs. Instead of waiting days (maybe weeks) on a part that’s been ordered, Brad has been manufacturing them himself.

In his most recent project, a rotary valve rebuild, Brad built a rotor knuckle to replace a broken one.

To fix the broken trombone knuckle, Brad first had to isolate the valve section by unsoldering it from the connected parts, this way he had full access to measure and fit in the newly created part. Next he got rid of all remnants of Brass Tubing in preparation for the knuckle, which was handmade by him. The new knuckle tubing had to be carefully measured to fit the dimensions of the port. A jig was created to set up the tubing to align with the rotor before brazing. The difficult part of brazing with silver Solder is preventing it from running into the rotor house, which is done by making sure the temperature of the metal doesn't get too hot. It takes a careful eye and a lot of experience because the smallest amount of excess solder in the rotor house would ruin the rotor.  After the parts are re-assembled, they can be buffed and relacquered making the knuckle look like new.

  • broken trombone knuckle

  • broken trombone knuckle

  • broken trombone knuckle; isolated the valve for complete access.

  • shows the rotor knuckle port clear of all remnants of brass tubing in preperation for the new knuckle (also made by Brad)

  • The new knuckle tubing specifically with the dimensions to fit the part

  • The jig set up pre-brazing the new knuckle to the old Rotor

  • The jig set up pre-brazing the new knuckle to the old Rotor

  • Post Brazed

  • Shows that the silver solder did not flow into the rotor, which would have ruined the rotor. While brazing one must take care to not get the metal too hot.

  • Post Brazed

  • Post Brazed

  • Shows the finished Rotor after it has been reassembled, buffed and laquered

  • Shows the finished Rotor after it has been reassembled, buffed and laquered

Written by : WM1st